Press

Watch Jason on Rogers Daytime with Chef Alex from Farmhouse Tavern, cooking up a storm:

Watch Jason on CHCH Morning Live cooking up our edamame with Farmers Feed Cities:

Ontario Grain Farmer Magazine –
Pristine Gourmet – Building a Value-Added Business

October 2012 – There’s no denying the success that has been achieved with Pristine Gourmet, Persall’s specialty company that produces virgin gourmet oils, wine vinegars, edamame, soy flour, sunflower flour, canola meal and roasted seed products.

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Local Farmer Takes His Passion On-Line – Hamilton Spectator

October 2010 – What is a Norfolk County farmer doing hosting a channel on YouTube?
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Reader’s Digest

January 2010 – Check out the latest interview and article with Jason Persall about our Canola Oil in the January 2010 edition of Canada's Reader's Digest. Page 103 contains the article on "Good Fats: You CAN Indulge this Season!"

A Focus on Family – Pristine Gourmet and The Children’s Aid Foundation

childrens_aid_foundation_logoThe Children’s Aid Foundation (CAF) is pleased to announce an exciting new partnership with Pristine Gourmet, a family-owned farming business based in Ontario. Starting in January 2008, 1% of retail sales of Pristine Gourmet’s premium canola oils, soybean oils and vinaigrettes will benefit the CAF and help to serve the thousands of abused, neglected and high-risk children in Canada.

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The brand new product line is 100% Canadian and owner Jason Persall is proud to be partnering with the CAF whose focus is also national. “As both a farmer and a father, I wanted to partner with an organization that shares my values. The Children’s Aid Foundation does this through its focus on children and families in communities across our country,” says Persall. Pristine Gourmet currently sells locally in Ontario but hopes to expand throughout Canada in the upcoming year.
The Children’s Aid Foundation would like to thank Pristine Gourmet for the opportunity to be part of this initiative and for their generous support of children in need.

Eat, Drink and be Daring – Toronto Life Magazine

Jason Persall, a grain farmer in Waterford, Ontario, discovered a few years ago that when it’s cold pressed without chemicals or solvents, canola seed produces a vibrant and flavour-packed oil—one that’s brilliant for salads or dipping
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Saveur

Cold-Pressed Gold – Saveur Magazine

Versatile, neutral-tasting canola oil has become such as workhorse in the modern kitchen that most people aren't aware of how recent a creation it is.

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Cold-Pressed Gold  Saveur Magazine
This artisanal canola oil has a surprisingly rich flavor

05/14/2008 
by: Pamela Cuthbert
Versatile, neutral-tasting canola oil has become such a workhorse in the modern kitchen that most people aren't aware of how recent a creation it is. Developed in the 1970s in Canada from a hybridized version of rapeseed, which comes from the tall, spindly rape plant (a relative of mustard and cabbage), the new cooking oil had rapeseed oil's low saturated-fat content but, thanks to crossbreeding, considerably lower levels of erucic acid, a natural compound that studies suggest is toxic in large doses. Canola, whose name is short for "Canada oil, low acid, was marketed as a healthful alternative to peanut oil and other cooking fats that were in wide use at the time. Canota also had a mellower, nuttier flavor than bitter-tasting rapeseed oil, but most consumers never got to taste it, because the high heat process manufacturers used to produce the oil neutralized the seed's flavor, making it fine for all-purpose cooking but not much else.

In the late 1990s, Jason Persall, a fourth generation farmer in Waterford, Ontario, read an article about a farmer who was producing canoia oil using a cold-press process that did not sap the seed's flavor. Intrigued by the idea that this common, local product could, like olive oil, possess distinctive tastes, Persall decided to build a small oil processing plant, purchasing his canola seed from a group of farmers who were growing a variety that, unlike the seeds cultivated across most of Canada, had not been genetically modified.
To make his oil, Persall employs a modernized version of a traditional cold-press method-used for centuries in Europe for making flaxseed oil and olive oil-chat entails simply crushing the seeds and filtering the oil that's extracted from them. The result is a golden-hued oil with the grassy aroma of canoh blossoms and a toasty, walnutty flavor that works beautifully as a salad dressing just served on its own with crusty bread. Persall's prodistine Gourmet Canola Oil, is available in 250-milliliter bottles for $8.99 and 500-milliliter bottles for $14.99. To order, call 519/443-4658 or visit www.pristinegourmet.com.

Oil’s well! The Persall’s Eye the Future with Optimism

What is Canada’s Maple Leaf doing beside the words “cold-pressed” and “extra virgin?” Terms we associate with olive oil assure us that flavour, aroma and nutritional benefits are intact. And now they are front and centre on the mock-up of a new label for Pristine Oils. As soy oil trickles from an auger-like press into a storage tank at the Persall Naturals processing facility in rural Waterford, Jason Persall explains.

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Oil’s well! The Persall’s Eye the Future with Optimism

Hamilton Spectator 09/01/2007

What is Canada’s Maple Leaf doing beside the words “cold-pressed” and “extra virgin?” Terms we associate with olive oil assure us that flavour, aroma and nutritional benefits are intact.

And now they are front and centre on the mock-up of a new label for Pristine Oils.

As soy oil trickles from an auger-like press into a storage tank at the Persall Naturals processing facility in rural Waterford, Jason Persall explains.

“The oil temperature when it exits the press is between 40 and 60 degrees Celsius,” says this fourth generation Norfolk farmer.

Processing the oil at a relatively low temperature helps preserve heat-sensitive vitamins, minerals and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.

The extra virgin moniker shows that the oil comes from the first mechanical pressing and no gases or chemicals have been used to extract it from the seeds.

Persall Naturals guarantees all their Pristine Oil products are free of seed that has been genetically modified. They grow their own soybeans in the surrounding fields, but seeds for their canola oil are grown on a farm where the weather’s a bit cooler, further north in the Lambton area.

How did Persall, from generations of livestock farms and chick hatcheries, come to be here explaining the nuances of gourmet oils? “I’ve always had a fascination with the food industry,” says Persall, “and my wife loves to cook.”

They bought their own farm in 1998 and deliberated on what they might produce to appeal to local foodies.

It took two years before the idea came to them: Why not try a gourmet vegetable oil?

Originally, they tried the head-on approach, targeting the retail market directly. But after getting tips from chefs at a culinary symposium in 2005, they reconsidered their strategy.

They put their products into the hands of well- known proponents of local food, chefs such as Michael Olson, Jamie Kennedy and Stephen Treadwell.

They, in turn, have helped to spread the word that there are gourmet-quality oils being produced in Ontario.

The Persalls have had a lot of media attention lately, but they still have tons of hard work ahead of them.

“We do a lot with Slow Food (a worldwide movement that boosts local cuisine) and next week we have 20 shipments going out as samples to chefs,” says Persall with cautious optimism.

There’s a package sitting on his desk, ready to go out to a food magazine in New York City. Slow expansion is part of the strategy.

They may add to the Persall Naturals line a raspberry wine vinegar and a naturally brewed soy sauce from other Ontario producers.

And among those mockup labels is one for sunflower oil. They don’t make this one yet, but when they do, it will be cold-pressed, extra virgin — and definitely local.

To learn more about Persall Naturals and Pristine Oils, or to order some of their products, check out their website or call 519-443-4658

 

Cannot Live on Riesling Alone – The Globe & Mail

By our second week on the 100-Mile Diet, my family's three-week experiment of eating only foods that are grown and processed within a tight 100-mile radius of Toronto, we were eating really well.
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Pristine Oils. The Natural Alternative – Toronto Star

We usually think of olive oil when we hear the phrase “cold- pressed.” A Waterford, Ont., farm family wants us to think of their canola and soybean oils, too. You'll be surprised at the clear, full flavours. Pristine Oils, made by Persall Naturals Ltd., are alternatives to not only olive oil, but those mass-produced, refined vegetable oils used slapdash in the kitchen
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